Raw Unfiltered All-Natural Local California Honey

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 klausesbees@yahoo.com    CALL: 805-320-2149 -or- 323-851-4541 / KLAUSESBEES, LLC

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APIARY - BEE KEEPING - the Art of

 

bee keeping is a full time,

 waking/sleeping kind of Zen- like endeavour -

an attempt to be in harmony with nature

to acknowledge the sound and movement of the bee

the smell of wax and smoke fill the nostrils

total concentration and focus is required

the study of conditions and constant

research of new techniques -

adaptation and

flexability are the key words - the Mantra

 

we all must be mad

but such a madness!!!

APIARY - BEE KEEPING - the Art of

 

bee keeping is a full time,

 waking/sleeping kind of Zen- like endeavour -

an attempt to be in harmony with nature

to acknowledge the sound and movement of the bee

the smell of wax and smoke fill the nostrils

total concentration and focus is required

the study of conditions and constant

research of new techniques -

adaptation and

flexability are the key words - the Mantra

 

we all must be mad

but such a madness!!!

Erika Wain

Klaus Koepfli and Erika WainDecker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT KLAUSESBEES

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Raw Unfiltered All Natural California Honey

Our honey is ripened - we do not 'take off' the honey until the bee herself has capped/sealed the honey comb cell in which the honey is placed; she alone knows when the moisture content is correct hence - we remove the honey only when the capping has reached a minimum of 75% closure. Our honey moisture content is between 12-14%.

The honey is extracted - it goes into the 'warming room' - 101F - no hotter - the honey does not loose any of its essentials at this temperature. This 'warming room' enables the wax cap/seal to be cut and the comb to be softened enough as to allow the honey to be extracted by centrifuge (spun out).

Unfiltered honey does not rob the honey of its essential goodness. We simply skim the top to remove debris.

All natural - No chemicals are used. No additives of any kind - The taste of the honey comes from the nectar in the flower which the bee then converts into honey. She alone is responsible for the taste.

California Bee Keeping

California Bee Keeping – is a Year Round adventure with nature – a crapshoot / expensive and frustrating, rewarding and enjoyable, hard labourious days and short nights.

The honey flow is NOT year round as many think – the honey ONLY flows IF there has been rain. One may see an abundance of flowers everywhere and think HONEY but without water there is none. RAIN = NECTAR = HONEY. It is that simple. No nectar NO HONEY.

Bee keeping techniques haven’t really changed all that much – the pests, the diseases, the travel, the expenses, and the return on the work – all that has changed. With the oncoming of the Africanized bee and the lack of understanding of the situation – the fear that caused so many ‘city fathers’ to ‘dissuade’ local beekeepers from keeping hives in backyards cut the control factor of marauding bees which could have been eradicated in part by informed beekeepers…. So instead we are inundated with this very territorial creature – one never quite knows when one’s hive has been ‘taken over’ as it were. The once backyard beekeeper without proper clothing no longer exists. Gloves, boots, suits one cannot do without here in California.

And importation issues of bringing in European bees (a milder creature) has stifled the gene pool expansion, which has diminished at an alarming rate here in the United States. Nature seems to be fighting back with the issue of sterility in males – both animal/insect and human with a rise of 18% in humans – something that is already seen in the queen bee who has to be replaced 2 and 3 times a year as she is continually superseded, or killed on sight/site or simply flies away.

The lack of education in schools of basic agriculture has created a widespread ignorance of just how important the bee is to pollination – no bee to pollinate the almond = no almond; strawberries would be white and hard…. (THE SILENCE OF THE BEE – video) ought to be a source of information for both the media and the layman as without the bee man is no long on this planet. Over population has put an impossible increase on food output, causing agriculture to change its focus to meet demand causing systemic damage to ground and water supply, genetically engineered product, an increase in air and noise pollution, viruses, pests, mites, transportation issues….. An endless array of living in the 21st Century.

The History of Beekeeping

Beekeeping is one of the oldest forms of food production. Some of the earliest evidence of beekeeping is from rock painting, dating to around 13,000bc. It was particularly well developed in Egypt and was discussed by the Roman writers, Virgil, Gaiu Julius Hyginus, Varro and Columella. Techniques have been passed down through generations with modern use hive products changing little since ancient times.

Before the 1980s, most U.S. hobby beekeepers were farmers or relatives of a farmer, lived in rural areas, and kept bees with techniques passed down for generations. The arrival of tracheal mites in the 1980s and varroa mites and small hive beetles in the 1990s led to the discontinuation of the practice by most of these beekeepers as their bees could not survive among these new parasites.

The Art of Beekeeping

The control of a colony mainly consists in taking care of the state of the “demography” of the hives. Although some call it a "science," the "art" of the beekeeper is in managing a colony's population so that the maximum number of bees is available for a task at a particular time. Most beekeepers are interested in a surplus of honey. Maximal honey production occurs when the most workers bees (both foragers and ripeners) are present at the exact same time that nectar-producing flowers (in both numbers and nectar production) are also at an optimum. For pollination, both the grower and beekeeper are looking for a surplus of foraging honey bees. Package bee and queen producers try to have as many nurse (young worker) bees as possible on hand. Queen breeders also try to manage drone population numbers.

A colony of bees is composed of a single queen, many workers (infertile females), drones (males), and a brood (eggs, larvae, and pupae). A hive is the box used by beekeepers to house a colony.

A colony of bees tries to accumulate a surplus of provisions (nectar and pollen) during the more favorable seasons (when there is a lot to forage, such as flowers available, along with good weather) in order to be able to survive the more unfavourable seasons and reproduce. This period is the winter in the Northern hemisphere; in the Southern Hemisphere and in Africa this period is the dry season, or Summer.

The population of the colony varies according to the seasons. It is important for the colony to have a large population (30,000 to 60,000+ individuals) when there is a lot of forage available, in order to achieve the greatest possible harvest. The population is minimal in the winter (6,000 individuals) in order to reduce the consumption of provisions. The colony should not be too weak, however, because the bees which overwinter have to revive the colony again in the spring. If the population is too small over winter, another problem may be encountered: honey bees need to cluster together in winter in order to maintain the temperature (95F degrees) required for their survival.

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when you purchase honey.

CALL: 805-320-2149  or  323-851-4541
klausesbees@yahoo.com